There have been numerous sightings of this bull Elk, most often seen near the town of Elk, appropriately enough. Paul Brewer recently spotted him south of Elk. Here the Elk is resting amidst some dairy cows.

I sure hope he doesn't think these dairy cows are his harem!

Thanks to Paul for allowing me to share his photo with you here. To see more of Paul's nature photography, here is the link to his website: http://www.capturingnatureswonders.com/

Finally, after no rain for February, we are finally getting a little bit of the wet stuff. This morning came with beautiful rainbows. I took this photo from our deck in Anchor Bay.

Cold air came in today, and temperatures are in the forties. That's cold for the coast! oh, I can hear people living in cold climes laughing at me for saying the forties are cold.

We have more rain in our forecast. Today has been a "wait five minutes" kind of day. Brilliant sunshine, brief downpours and windy. Lots of visitors are here for the three-day holiday. They are getting quite a show.

Even while the southward migration of Gray Whales continues, the first northward-bound Grays have been seen. These are the newly pregnant females, and they are heading fast to their feeding grounds in the Bering Sea. They will be eating for two! Scott and Tree Mercer, of Mendonoma Whale and Seal Study, saw their first northbound Gray on Tuesday around noon.

Here is a fun photo taken by Ken Bailey a while ago of what I believe are two Gray Whales, one spouting and the other diving, showing the tail.

Ken also photographed the barnacle-encrusted head of a Gray Whale.

Here is the migration map of the Gray Whales, a journey of about 5,000 miles, one way.

Pretty amazing!

Thanks to Ken for allowing me to share his photos with you here. To see more of Ken's photography, including his wonderful underwater photography, here is the link: http://www.seadreams.org/

To follow the Mercers' daily posts of their sightings, here is the link to their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Mendonoma-Whale-and-Seal-Study-1421926098039236/

Kathy Bishop caught a Great Blue Heron with its mouth wide open. Who knew this is what a GBH's mouth looked like?!

Great Blue Herons are year round residents of the Mendonoma coast. They can be seen hunting rodents on grassy meadows, and standing in calm water, looking for a tasty fish.

Here's a fun photo of a GBH coming in for a landing, taken by Robert Scarola.

They are quite beautiful when they lift off, as you will see in this wonderful photo by Paul Brewer.

Thanks to Kathy, Robert and Paul for allowing me to share their photos with you here. To see more of Paul's nature photography, here is his website: http://www.capturingnatureswonders.com/

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To celebrate the day of love, here are some hearts for you. First, heart-shaped rocks found on the Mendonoma coast, hand-painted by Jann Littleton.

And a driftwood heart, photographed by Craig Tooley.

A heart-shaped cave photographed by Kate Gelles.

And the heart-shaped blow of a Gray Whale, photographed by Carol Bogovich.

Happy Valentine's Day, from me to you!