Tag Archives: Ron LeValley

Ron LeValley captured this photo sight. Look through the opening in the rocks and you will see a mother Harbor Seal with her pup.

Harbor Seal pups have been weaned from their mothers, much to their dismay. They now are fishing for themselves. Tide Pool beach at The Sea Ranch, which is closed during pupping, is now back open.

Thanks to Ron for allowing me to share his photo with you here. To see much more of Ron's nature photography, here is the link to his website: http://levalleyphoto.com/home/

Cream Cups, Platystemon californicus, are blooming now. They are members of the Poppy family and are found on sunny  areas. This year we are having a wonderful bloom of them, as Ron LeValley found out.

Mary Sue Ittner also recently photographed them, from a different angle.

Their sunny faces are sure to make you smile! We are smiling on the coast today as the strong winds that blew for the past two days have moved on. It's a perfect time to enjoy all the spring beauty on the Mendonoma coast.

Thanks to Ron and Mary Sue for allowing me to share their photos with you here. To see much more of Ron's nature photography, here is the link to his website: http://levalleyphoto.com/home/

Ron LeValley photographed one of my favorite wildflowers, Baby Blue Eyes. It's okay to play favorites, isn't it? Ron says the warm weather between storms has coaxed a few early bloomers.

In March, you might come along a meadow filled with these beauties, as Ron did in a previous year.

Thanks to Ron for allowing me to share his photos with you here. To see much more of Ron's nature photography, here is the link to his website: http://www.levalleyphoto.com/home/

Ron LeValley was up early to capture the morning light, clouds and the waves at the Little River Headlands.

It's a mystical look, isn't it? And here is a photo Ron took a few years ago just at sunset, with the waves back-lit by the setting sun.

 

I thank Ron for allowing me to share his photo with you on this first day of 2017. To see much more of Ron's nature photography, here is the link to his website: http://levalleyphoto.com/home/

Ron LeValley went on a pelagic trip out of Fort Bragg. He, and the others with him, did not see many birds, but they did see two Blue whales quite close to their boat. In the first photo, the whale had just spouted. And in the second photo the big whale is descending.

blue-whale-off-fort-bragg-by-ron-levalley blue-whale-came-close-to-our-boat-by-ron-levalleyTo see a Blue whale, the largest creature of them all, is incredibly exciting. Here are three photos Ron took a few years ago, also on a pelagic trip. The first shows you a blow, the second shows the Blue whale's tiny dorsal fin, and the last shows you a Blue whale's tail.

blue-whale-spout-by-ron-levalley a-blue-whales-small-dorsal-fin-by-ron-levalley blue-whales-tale-by-ron-levalleyUnless you are at the Farallon Islands/Cordell Banks, you are not likely to see more than two Blue whales at a time. They very rarely breach, like Gray whales and Humpback whales do; they are just too big.

Thanks to Ron for allowing me to share his photos with you here. To see much more of Ron's nature photography, here is his website: http://levalleyphoto.com/home/