Tag Archives: Ken Bailey

It's so wonderful to continue to see two mature Bald Eagles at the Gualala River. Ken Bailey photographed this one last week on Tuesday at the Gualala River.

One of the eagles likes to perch on a snag near the river mouth. You can see the snag from the north end of the Gualala Bluff Trail, behind Trink's Cafe.

Thanks to Ken for allowing me to share his photos with you here. To see more of Ken's photography, including stunning underwater photography, here is his website: http://www.seadreams.org/

The day Ken Bailey photographed the two Bald Eagles, he also photographed a Common Raven perched on a snag.

Ravens are bigger cousins of Crows. They are extremely intelligent and have many vocalizations. I was told there are over 40 different sounds Ravens make. To prove the point, a few days ago I thought our golden retriever, Sunny, was choking. Nope, it was a Raven just outside the open window. Fooled again!

A fun photo of a Raven was taken by C'Anna Bergman-Hill. She captioned it, "Look Ma, I'm standing on one leg!"

Thanks to Ken and C'Anna for allowing me to share their photos with you here.

One of the mature Bald Eagles flew towards the Gualala River yesterday, and I had a nice sighting of my own. The big eagle landed on the sandbar of the river and stared out to the ocean. After about twenty minutes, the bald eagle flew over the ocean, dipping down several time, attempting to find a fishy meal.

Ken Bailey photographed the two bald eagles with the backdrop of a large wave several weeks ago.

We wondered if this might be mating behavior, but it is very late for that activity. Playing? Fighting? Practice mating? No one knows for sure.

What we do know is we have two mature bald eagles here for several months now. In the late afternoon they fly north.

Thanks to Ken for allowing me to share his photos with you here. To see much more of Ken's nature photography, here is his website: http://www.seadreams.org/

It's always exciting to spot a Gray Whale. They are migrating northward now. Ken Bailey photographed the distinctive tail.

And a barnacle-encrusted head.

The mother/calf pairs aren't too far behind. In the weeks to come, we should be seeing them off our coast. The calves have to get strong enough while in the lagoons off of Baja before they begin their 5,000 mile journey with their mother.

Thanks to Ken for allowing me to share his photos with you here. To see much more of Ken's nature photography, especially his beautiful underwater photography, here is his website: http://www.seadreams.org/

Ken Bailey caught this action near the Gualala River. The bird on the left is an adult Peregrine Falcon and the bird on the right is a juvenile. Perhaps the adult is teaching the younger bird some important lesson.

adult-peregrine-falcon-on-the-left-reprimanding-a-juvenile-by-ken-baileyIt seems like the younger bird is thinking, "YIKES!"

We had two nests of Peregrine Falcons successfully breed here this year. Here's a photo taken by Michael Beattie of the two chicks in a nest off the Point Arena-Stornetta Lands.

two-downy-peregrine-falcon-chicks-by-michael-beattie

Thanks to Ken and Michael for allowing me to share their photos with you here. To see much more of Ken's photography, especially his underwater photography, here is the link to his website: http://www.seadreams.org/